Frequently Asked Questions

  • Surface water from rivers and lakes (natural and man-made) is extensively used globally to fulfil daily water needs. India also relies heavily on groundwater for agriculture, industrial and drinking water needs. Groundwater is fast depleting, especially on the western side of India, and many locations face the risk of arsenic and fluoride poisoning. Highly saline groundwater is also a common problem, rendering it useless without proper treatment.

  • The largest source are the seas and oceans which together contain 97% of all the water on Earth, however it’s highly saline and can’t be used without treatment. Water is also present in the air, in biomass and also permanently locked in glaciers and permafrost.

  • Air contains 12 quadrillion liters of water vapor which is almost ten times the water we have in all the rivers combined. This quantity of water can satisfy the needs of every huma being on earth for a year. Moreover, water vapor in the air is a very sustainable resource and gets completely replenished every 7-8 days by natural water cycle of evaporation and condensation.

  • A family of four usually consumes 15-20 liters of water per day for their cooking and drinking water needs. The consumption pattern is pretty similar in many countries.

  • EVA is a solar device which sources clean drinking water from thin air.

  • EVA uses a hygroscopic material in combination with solar thermal energy to source water from thin air. The hygroscopic material is used to adsorb the water vapor from the air during the night and during day solar thermal energy is used to heat the hygroscopic material and separate the water molecules which are then condensed at ambient conditions to give liquid water.

  • 95% of commercially available AWG’s are based on condensation cooling technology which uses refrigerants and compressors to remove heat from the air and cool it. These systems run on electricity and consume large amounts of power. They are also very ineffcient in low humidity conditions. The other 5% of systems are based on liquid hygroscopic materials and inorganic salts which have proven to be hard to handle and require high maintenance. EVA, on the other hand, uses a unique solid desiccant technology which combined with solar thermal energy is highly sustainable, simple to use and maintain, and gives reliable performance even in the driest of conditions.

  • Each unit of EVA can make about 20 liters of potable drinking water per day. For applications requiring more than 20 liters of water a day, multiple EVA units can be used in combination.

  • The water produced by EVA is Type-I water as per ASTM D1193 and ISO 3696. Type-I water is considered as “Ultra” pure water, free from dissolved pollutants and microbes. In order to make water more suitable for human consumption, the Type-I water produced is passed through a mineral cartridge to increase the pH and add required minerals.

  • Yes, every EVA unit collects real-time data on various parameters like climatic conditions, water production, quality and usage. It also allows for remote monitoring and predictive maintenance, so tasks like replacing the mineral cartridge are just a press-of-a button away.

  • The air is passed through a five-stage filtration system, removing all the pollutants before it enters EVA. The air used in the process of making water is thus pollutant free. Hence, the pollution in the environment does not affect the water quality.

  • EVA has a rated life of 10 years. Solar components - both thermal and photovoltaic are rated for 15 years.

  • EVA is designed to be a passive device with close to zero moving parts. There is no need for any regular maintenance. However, the mineral cartridge and air filters need to be replaced once in every 2 years. The unit will also require minimal cleaning to keep the surface dust-free.

  • EVA is designed to work on 100% renewable energy. Hence, there is no operational cost to run the machine.

  • EVA can be used to serve the drinking water needs of a single household to a community of households to an entire village. It can also be used in hospitals, schools, institutional buildings in both urban and rural areas or also for emergency operations and disaster relief. Specific agricultural applications such as providing water in greenhouses or nurseries are also viewed as being viable.